The Aerodrome Home Page
Aces of WWI
Aircraft of WWI
Books and Film
The Aerodrome Forum
Sign the Guestbook
Help
Links to Other Sites
Medals and Decorations
The Aerodrome News
Search The Aerodrome
Today in History


Learn how to remove ads

The Aerodrome Forum


Go Back   The Aerodrome Forum > Archives > Models


Models Topics related to WWI aircraft models. Forum is closed for posting.

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 7 September 2004, 04:34 PM   #11 (permalink)
Forum Ace
 
NeilE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Reservoir, Melbourne, Aust
Posts: 949
 
Nice build article Stephen...

One little point though...

On the Australian Pfalz D-XII, the dominant interior colour (believed to be unrestored) is actually a painted light grey colour, close to a Humbrol 64, rather than a varnished wood finish.

How much time all up did it take you all up to complete it?

ATB

Neil
__________________
"There's something wrong with our bloody ships today." - Adm. Beatty, Jutland, 1916.
NeilE is offline  
Old 7 September 2004, 04:54 PM   #12 (permalink)
Shot Down
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,752
 
This brings up a good point on the Austrailian owned D.XII 2600/18. Often the refinishing or rebuilding by restoration crews tend to add solid colours to interiors for varous reasons. Mostly as a way to keep moistrure and dry rot fungi out of the woods and fabric. Another similar treatment was the Fokker D.VII in Munich was painted medium-dark green in its interior areas. Even the interior face of the lozenge fabric was painted.

Now, there are other materials that modern builders use other than linen that rot far less. Most WWI single seat and multiseat aircraft were not heavily painted in their interiors. Simply because of weight.

I know of two exceptions,
1. early Roland C.II types appeared to be painted lt. blue on their interior walls & flooring.
2. Sea plane type aircraft were painted on their interiors to larger degrees because of the salt sea air.

Just my opinion.

I finished the build in under 25 hours over a four week period.
StephenLawson is offline  
Old 7 September 2004, 07:10 PM   #13 (permalink)
Shot Down
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,752
 
Hello folks I have been asked offline to clarify a statemnt in step 1.

'... I also added a scratchbuilt tachometer between the machine gun breeches. The face was laid on its side in its housing ( this was for ease of reading in-flight and was a normal practice of its time.) This means that top dead center was moved to the 3 O'clock position...

Hope that helps.
StephenLawson is offline  
Old 8 September 2004, 03:15 AM   #14 (permalink)
Observer
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 48
 
Quote:
This brings up a good point on the Austrailian owned D.XII 2600/18. Often the refinishing or rebuilding by restoration crews tend to add solid colours to interiors for varous reasons.
Eight years ago I spent an entire day photographing and measuring that aircraft and the AWM's Albatros D.Va

I was given a research assistant by the AWM's PR manager (actually, about 5 different ones over 2 days there and at Treloar) and allowed to take some considerable liberties.

One was to climb on a ladder and photograph behind the seat. The curator had been kind enough to expose the areas left conserved but unrestored so that I could see the original interior colour.

We discussed it at length, including why the AWM has a policy of "No fake histories" and the research that was being conducted prior to the imminent restoration of both of these aircraft. About things like spectrographs and stripping paint in layers a couple of microns thick to determine the painting history...

The interior was painted light grey. It was painted light grey at the factory.

Of course, he may have been wrong, but it sure sounded convincing to me. But then, like the AWM people, I am but a simple yokel

Shane
shaneweier is offline  
Old 8 September 2004, 10:09 AM   #15 (permalink)
Shot Down
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,752
 
Interesting... The AWM and the ex- Champlin Fighter museum have the same interior description. 'Grey to lt. grey' Has anyone seen the one that was at Le Brouget? The one in the NASM's hands has been so mistreated it would be no good to even try there. Noting the Ex-Champlin D.XII is has gone through 5 separte restorations. It is very possible that the museums conversed on their findings.


Curiouser and curiouser

Last edited by StephenLawson; 1 March 2005 at 09:19 AM.
StephenLawson is offline  
Old 8 September 2004, 10:14 AM   #16 (permalink)
Shot Down
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,752
 
I believe that this is Mr. Weier's image from AWM.

Last edited by StephenLawson; 1 March 2005 at 09:17 AM.
StephenLawson is offline  
Old 8 September 2004, 05:29 PM   #17 (permalink)
Forum Ace
 
Lyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 780
 
It might be worth noting that the man responsible for the Champlin Museum's Pfalz restoration, Mr. Bob Rust, is still working on projects in his shop near Griffin, Georgia. At the time it was first restored (1958), the Pfalz was in the ownership of Frank Tallman. I visited him some years ago but the question of the Pfalz's interior color never popped up. Is anyone here in contact with him?
__________________
The ox is slow but the earth is patient
Lyle is offline  
Old 25 September 2004, 04:51 PM   #18 (permalink)
Forum Ace
 
Lyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Clearwater, FL
Posts: 780
 
Greetings Stephen,
Being something of a gadfly now and then, where are those pics of your Pfalz? We are most anxious to see what thou hast produced...
Lyle is offline  
Old 26 September 2004, 02:07 PM   #19 (permalink)
Rest in Peace
 
Dan_San_Abbott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Ceres, California
Posts: 9,119
Images: 22
 

My Gallery
Interior fabric surfaces.

StephenLawson:
Steve, could please give me your source that states, "interior fabric surfaces were painted". I have never seen or heard of this being done.
On aircraft with wood or plywood covered fuselage surfaces the interior surfaces were painted. I have two photographs of the fuselage cross of a Pfalz D.XII, one is interior and the other exterior. The interior of the shell is painted medium grey. On the exterior around the cross is a pea green color.
I would like to know your source on this painting of the interior surface of the fabric.
Blue skies,
Dan-San
Dan_San_Abbott is offline  
Old 26 September 2004, 03:20 PM   #20 (permalink)
Shot Down
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 9,752
 
Hey Dan; The issue I am familair with is on restored aircraft. Often the refinishing or rebuilding by restoration crews tend to add solid colours to interiors for varous reasons. Mostly as a way to keep moistrure and dry rot fungi out of the woods and fabric. Another similar treatment was the Fokker D.VII in Munich was painted medium-dark green in its interior areas. Even the interior face of the lozenge fabric was painted.

Now, there are other materials that modern builders use other than linen that rot far less. Most WWI single seat and multiseat aircraft were not heavily painted in their interiors. Simply because of weight.
StephenLawson is offline  
 

Bookmarks

Tags
special, hobby, 148, pfalz, dxii, build


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Special Hobby Pfalz DXII G. Scott Long Models 11 23 September 2006 09:39 PM
Special Hobby Pfalz DXII 2519/18 markings... Henry J. Models 5 13 July 2004 01:02 PM
Some notes on the Special Hobby Pfalz D.XII TMC Models 2 8 June 2004 06:29 PM
On the sprue Special Hobby Pfalz D.XII Ross_Moorhouse Models 27 19 May 2004 09:14 AM
Any flames about the Special Hobby Pfalz D-12 loze Ross_Moorhouse Models 18 16 April 2004 12:57 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright 1997 - 2013 The Aerodrome