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2001 Closed threads from 2001 (read only)

 
 
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Old 2 December 2001, 05:52 AM   #1
leo
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In building a replica WWI aircraaft, I would presume that it would be well high impossible to obtain original engines. I suppose modern radials could substitute for rotaries, but which are favored for this usage? Which are used as in-line substitutes?
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Old 2 December 2001, 08:22 AM   #2
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Rotary engined replica birds are commonly powered by 145hp Warner or 220hp Continental radials. Types that were powered by V-8 engines (SPAD, SE5A) are usually powered by a common horizontally opposed aircraft engine in the 200hp range, typically a Lycoming or Continental. In-line birds like the Fokker D.VII and Albatros will usually substitute a 200hp Ranger in-line 6 converted to run upright.
 
Old 2 December 2001, 12:50 PM   #3
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Hi all,

Just came accross a photo of Nieuport 24C with a Hisso. Does anyone remember Carl swanson's "knock about" (sport) Spad with the Buick Invicta V-8? Was it successfull? This might be the answer to Hisso availability. The 24C?... just a strange engine /aircraft association.
Charles
 
Old 2 December 2001, 12:59 PM   #4
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I've never seen the SPAD you speak of. Clifford Aeroworks offers an 80% SPAD for a Geo Tracker engine though.
www.cliffordaeroworks.com
 
Old 3 December 2001, 05:39 AM   #5
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Just remember that when one uses a modern engine to replace those of yesteryear a problem soon becomes apparent. The old engines usually had a max rpm in the 1400-1700 range while more modern engines are usually up in the 2600-3000 range. Hence the old engines produced a lot more torque per rpm. What it boils down to is that when one uses more modern engines you can't use a scale propellor. Newer propellors have smaller diameters to efficiently use the power available for the lower-torque, higher-rpm modern engines. However, this said, plenty of people use modern engines because they have no choice......certainly understandable. The aircraft sound different from the originals but that's a pretty small price to pay to be able to get up into the air.
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Old 3 January 2002, 07:57 AM   #6
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Slightly Modified VW engines with a REDRIVE of about 2.2:1 would be good. This would give you a Prop RPM of about 1363 RPM at engine RPM of 3000. This would allow a 85-90" prop or more. Remember a redrive is a torque multiplier, not just a rpm adjuster. There are a couple of new small scale radial engines out there but haven't been proven as of yet. If you build a heavy duty full scale you can use a modified M14P Russian Radial. Steve Culp of Culp Aviation is building Sopwith Pup kits to use this engine . Normally, the M14 is of 280-360 HP at 2900+ RPM. It uses a redrive. Steve Culp is removing the redrive and putting on a cover from another Russian engine and Running direct drive at 1800 rpm and getting 160 hp.
Should run forever at this speed.
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Old 3 January 2002, 08:24 AM   #7
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Quote:
Slightly Modified VW engines with a REDRIVE of about 2.2:1 would be good. This would give you a Prop RPM of about 1363 RPM at engine RPM of 3000.
Dwight,

Where would one get a reduction drive like the one you mention? Great Plains has three ratios listed on their web site: Available in 3 ratios: 1.29 to 1, 1.6 to 1, and 2.0 to 1. Are there other companies making redrives for VW engines?

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Old 5 January 2002, 06:19 PM   #8
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There is currently a book in publication that covers this topic. *It is titled: Converting Auto Engines for Experimental Aircraft.

I got a copy a few years ago, and it contained a lot of good information. *I was casting about for an engine for a replica of an Albatross B-II (two-seater)

Bill
 
Old 6 January 2002, 07:15 AM   #9
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Thanks, Bill, I'll see if I can get a copy!

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Old 6 January 2002, 07:29 AM   #10
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This company carries that title, along with many others useful to homebuilders:

http://www.buildersbooks.com/index.html
 
 

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