The Aerodrome Home Page
Aces of WWI
Aircraft of WWI
Books and Film
The Aerodrome Forum
Help
Links to Other Sites
Medals and Decorations
Search The Aerodrome
Today in History


The Aerodrome Forum


Go Back   The Aerodrome Forum > WWI Aviation > Aircraft

Aircraft Topics related to WWI aircraft, aircraft engines and armament

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 20 October 2003, 12:39 AM   #11
topgun56
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

But then the US was only in the war for 18 mos.

I have seen reports that the US DH 4 was a fire hazard.

And the Tommy Morse Scout was a good a/c.
 
Old 20 October 2003, 04:17 AM   #12
Lufbery
Forum Ace
 
Lufbery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Harrisburg, PA
Posts: 2,680

 
Quote:
I have seen reports that the US DH 4 was a fire hazard.
TG,

The Smithsonian Air & Space Museum has (or at least used to have) a great display on this very topic in their World War I section.

As I remember it, it goes something like this: The large fuel tank that sat between the pilot and observer led to the plane getting the sobriquet of "Flying Coffin." I'm sure a few even caught fire after being hit, thus confirming the crews' worst fears. But, the display goes on to say, pretty much every plane was vulnerable to having its fuel tank punctured leading to a fire. The DH-4 was no more of a flaming coffin than the rest of the Great War planes.

Regards,
__________________
Drew Ames

"Drew can talk -- by Jove, how the man can talk!" -- James Norman Hall in "High Adventure"
Lufbery is offline  
Old 20 October 2003, 12:19 PM   #13
cameldriver
Scout Pilot
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 419

I have spoken to or read interviews with 3 or 4 men who flew the US DH4. They all has high regard for it. These were all reconnaissance pilots. Loaded with bombs, the performance suffered. There were some planes that had self-sealing fuel tanks, the Salmson was one, and were less likely to catch fire if hit in the tank. I don't know why all manufacturers didn't incorporate this feature.
cameldriver is offline  
Old 21 October 2003, 03:29 PM   #14
flypaper
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Leo,
From what I've read only one Curtiss SE5 was built before the war ended and the contract cancelled for the rest. The one built was of very poor quaility and was in fact a danger to fly. This info comes from an old issue of the AAHA journal which printed a copy of the test report.

Flypaper
 
Old 21 October 2003, 03:38 PM   #15
flypaper
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Leo

The Curtiss N-9 was used in the Azores by the USMC for anti-sub patrols.

Flypaper
 
Old 22 October 2003, 11:57 AM   #16
Vigilant
Forum Ace
 
Vigilant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1998
Location: Devon
Posts: 983

 
Lufberry,

Apparently his dislike of being the 'meat' in an engine/fuel tank sandwich in the event of a crash was one of Lindy's reasons for putting the main tank in front of the pilot in Spirit of St.Louis. Visibility did suffer a little though...

Denny,

Your comments about commercial rivalry may be well taken. However, you guys certainly stitched us up after WWII when it was agreed that GB and the US would swap information on supersonic flight. Miles Aircraft disclosed all their data on their M52 prototype, and the Pentagon then decided the US data was 'classified'! The Bell X-1 bore an uncanny resemblance to the M52, and the rest is history... :-X

Vig.
__________________
Fly a microlight - http://www.bmaa.org
Vigilant is offline  
Old 22 October 2003, 11:25 PM   #17
topgun56
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Lindy just wanted a good Center of Gravity.
 
Old 23 October 2003, 03:56 AM   #18
Denny
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Vig: Touche. May I recommend a look on any search engine using the term "Bolling Commission" for a look at the US experience with our allies.
DD
 
Old 23 October 2003, 08:24 AM   #19
Vigilant
Forum Ace
 
Vigilant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 1998
Location: Devon
Posts: 983

 
What, this one?

The Bolling Commission on
the Future of Virginia's Environment. Senator Bill Bolling.


www.virginia.edu/ien/VNRLI_faculty.html

Oh, this one! Those damn Limeys! *

They chose the De Havilland partly because the British government granted free use of its license for the aircraft rather than because of any superiority to French aircraft, which required payment of a royalty to produce.

http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/Aerospace/WWi/Aero5.htm

Vig. *
__________________
Fly a microlight - http://www.bmaa.org
Vigilant is offline  
Old 23 October 2003, 08:34 AM   #20
Denny
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Vig: That's why we have boundless faith in you guys as allies. Damn, we trashed that myth, didn't we! Still, given the choice between A and B, hope springs eternal.
DD
 
Closed Thread

Bookmarks

Tags
built, warplanes


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Warplanes on PBS big_news_1 Movies, Television & Video 5 12 November 2006 04:51 PM
How were WWI warplanes created Colin 2000 5 4 May 2000 01:54 AM
The First Warplanes???!!!!????!!!! Ira_Silverman 2000 8 10 February 2000 07:05 PM
Lack of American Warplanes HORRIDO! 2000 14 28 January 2000 02:02 PM


As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2024 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©1997 - 2023 The Aerodrome