The Aerodrome Home Page
Aces of WWI
Aircraft of WWI
Books and Film
The Aerodrome Forum
Help
Links to Other Sites
Medals and Decorations
Search The Aerodrome
Today in History


The Aerodrome Forum


Go Back   The Aerodrome Forum > Archives > 2001

2001 Closed threads from 2001 (read only)

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 25 December 2001, 07:49 AM   #1
CarlGurt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I just read a book titled "Canvas Falcons", about WWI planes and pilots. For the last forty years, I had thought the fabric used on WWI planes was linen. I'd like to learn more.
 
Old 25 December 2001, 08:17 AM   #2
PeterL
Forum Ace
 
PeterL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 1998
Location: Stockport UK

 
"For the last forty years, I had thought the fabric used on WWI planes was linen."

And for forty years you have been correct. What's more it was generally linen of the finest quality.

I came late to Longstreet and found him a very difficult read. It starts with the title and gets worse IMO. It's the kind of work that drives people to make disparaging remarks in pencil in the margins. Not to be regarded as a serious work.
__________________
cheers

Peter L
PeterL is offline  
Old 25 December 2001, 09:27 AM   #3
Dan_San_Abbott
Rest in Peace
 
Dan_San_Abbott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Ceres, California
Posts: 9,118

 

My Gallery
CarlGurt:
The term canvas has been grossly misused relative to early aircraft and WW1 aircraft as well. As soon as I see that used, I say to myself, here is a guy that does not know what he is talking about, the canvas is generally followed with "wood, baling wire and chewing gum!" The term "canvas" is applied to fabrics in excess of 8 ounces per square yard. (cotton or linen.)
The early aircraft were covered with light linen "balloon cloth" around 2 ounces per square yard and was coated with a rubberized compound to seal the fabric, this was before to introduction of cellouse or nitrate dopes. In WW1 both sides, used linen fabric that weighed around 3.5 to 4.5 ounces per square yard. Cellouse and nitrate dopes were in critical short supply by both sides, therefore it was used sparingly. The general application was 3 or 4 brush in coats to shrink the fabric taut on the frame. Following the first coat, the rib tapes would be doped on. Following each coat of dope the surface would be sanded to prepare the surface for the next coat. The camouflage color was most often a single coat of colored dope or oil based paint, rarely two. The name was WEIGHT! Weight, is loss of performance.
I hope this of help.
A Very Merry Christmas Day to you and yours,
Dan-San
Dan_San_Abbott is offline  
Old 25 December 2001, 09:53 AM   #4
Volker_Nemsch
Forum Ace of Aces
 
Volker_Nemsch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Germany
Posts: 4,156

 
Hello CarlGurt!

As Dan San and Peter already said you are right. But there were some exceptions:

The recon aircraft aboard the German cruiser/raider "Wolf" (a Friedrichshafen 2-seater seaplane) was damaged during a rough landing on the Pacific ocean and most of the original fabric was destroyed. Fortunately the crew had a lot of SILK from a captured ship and so the aircraft "flew on silk wings" after the necessary repairs (the silk was doped with the chemicals Dan San mentioned). I donīt know what happened to this "expensive" aircraft after the return of the "Wolf" to Germany in 1918.

Somewhere I read that one or two Fokker Dr.1 were tested with (industrial?) silk instead of the normal linen. But most probably others know more about this ...

Hope this helps!
__________________
Best regards from Germany
Volker Nemsch



"My words came out fine. The problem is that they were incorrectly processed by your brain."
(???)

"Much to learn, you still have."
(Yoda)

"I never said all that shit!"
(Confucius)
Volker_Nemsch is offline  
Old 25 December 2001, 10:40 AM   #5
chip55
Scout Pilot
 
chip55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Dayton area, Ohio
Posts: 331

 
Hello

When I was a kid me pops had a Stinson Gull wing. I remember him referring to the covering as Irish Linen.

Be well and Merry Christmas to all

chip55
__________________
I'm out of my mind... be back in five minutes. If I return before I get back, tell me to stay put until I get there.
chip55 is offline  
Old 25 December 2001, 05:29 PM   #6
Dan_San_Abbott
Rest in Peace
 
Dan_San_Abbott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Ceres, California
Posts: 9,118

 

My Gallery
Chip55:
You are correct! Irish linen was the best available, and it was the linen of choice also by British aircraft constructors in WW1.
Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year,
Dan-San
Dan_San_Abbott is offline  
Old 26 December 2001, 03:48 AM   #7
Baron_von_Tecumseh
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

They tryed hemp cloth,but the planes
just kept getting higher and higher
in the air,and pilots had trouble
landing,because the planes didn't
want to come down
 
Old 26 December 2001, 04:33 AM   #8
Rex_Feral
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Quote:
They tryed hemp cloth,but the planes
just kept getting higher and higher
in the air,and pilots had trouble
landing,because the planes didn't
want to come down
***GROAN***
 
Old 26 December 2001, 08:20 AM   #9
Andy_Fox
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

As I understand it[or if you prefer-get out clause!!] Irish linen was the fabric of choice because of its quality and ,if I read a recent article about a company that recovers fabric airplanes and various bits thereof,still is.But I am damned if I can remember where I saw the blasted Article!! >
 
Old 26 December 2001, 11:37 AM   #10
CarlGurt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I really appreciate the information so quickly supplied by - clearly - some very knowledgeable people. As I've been looking around "The Aerodrome" I've been astounded by the breath and depth of the knowledge displayed.
 
 

Bookmarks

Tags
fabric


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
WW1 Fabric Gintaras Replica Aircraft 7 19 May 2007 08:16 PM
F.1 102/17 Fabric on Ebay!!! Dave_Watts Memorabilia 31 11 January 2006 07:56 PM
Fabric from 425/17 Jack Thomas 2000 14 6 October 2000 07:17 PM
Auctioned 425/17 fabric Phil J 1999 2 30 October 1999 08:30 PM
Lozenge Fabric Kojack 1999 7 8 August 1999 07:39 PM


As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2024 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Đ1997 - 2023 The Aerodrome