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2002 Closed threads from 2002 (read only)

 
 
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Old 24 September 2001, 03:25 PM   #1
Brad
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How many of you are building/are considering building a WWI replica. (not models, full size or near full-size experimental category aircraft.)
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Old 24 September 2001, 05:23 PM   #2
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Brad,
My brother and I are planning on building a Fokker D.VIII. *It will be quite a while before we start welding up anything, but we have the engine and have been getting it ready to run this past year. *It's a 160 Gnome! *8) *Right now we are trying to get a selector switch or at least the plans so we can fabricate one, but I understand this engine can be run by being "blipped" as well, instead of cutting ignition to a number of cylinders. *What a racket this engine is! *The Sopwith Camel at Rhinebeck uses one, and the alternating roaring and crackling is fantastic.
I hope to have the plane done for the 100th anniversary of the D.VIII's debut, preferably before then, however! *
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Old 24 September 2001, 10:19 PM   #3
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I pulling all the info together for a full scale replica Albatros D.Va, but it probably won't fly for 10 years or so.
 
Old 25 September 2001, 05:04 AM   #4
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Brad,

I've been looking into building one of the Graham Lee Nieuport replicas. Either the 7/8 scale N-12 or the full-sized N-17. The only problem right now is that I'm not even a licensed pilot and my last flight in a small airplane was over ten years ago.

I'm going to be graduating college this December (a 10-year process), and I'm planning on starting to learn how to fly after that. In the meantime, I'm learning all that I can about what it takes to build an airplane. I've wanted to build a WWI replica since I was in high school.

-Drew
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Old 25 September 2001, 11:34 AM   #5
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I am almost done with the restoration of my PA-18 and am seriously concidering a full size WW1 replica. I am interested in Bob Baslee's full size Nieuport. Did any of you see it at OSH?

My first choise would be a Redfern Nieuport. The problem is the engine. I have a Gnome 160 but the fuss and pucker factors are, I think, beyond me.

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Old 25 September 2001, 02:44 PM   #6
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I guess I should answer my own question. I have a strong desire, almost an obsession, to build an WWI replica.

I also have several interested friends. The Graham Lee replicas are nice, but frankly I want a German aircraft, and NO, the SS D-I doesn't meet my requirements. That was a very obscure aircraft at best.

I like Robert Baslee's aircraft, but he took just a few too many liberties with them- they don't look quite authentic enough. Close, but no cigar. (Example, the extra wing struts on the D-VIII replica, or the E-III replica only having 1 set of flying/landing wires instead of 2, or the wire bracing on the Dr-I and D-VII replicas) They are still nice aircraft, and I would encourage anyone interested to go ahead and build them. He's also a heck of a nice guy- I met him at Oshkosh '98.

My personal "like" list, in order, is: Albatross D-whatever, (I like all of them) Fokker Dr-I, Fokker E-III, Fokker D-VIII, and Fokker D-VII.

Here are the pros/cons:
Albatross: (+)No doubt the prettiest, and probably one of the best if not THE best flyer. Generous tail surfaces, with fixed fin and horizontal stabilizer. Long nose, easy to balance with a heavy pilot. (-)Difficult to build, and difficult (maybe impossible?) to finish at the 254 lb. weight limit for an ultralight under US regs.

Fokker Dr-I: (+)High coolness factor, SMALL (wouldn't take up much room for storage) (-)Cantilever wings (can I work that out safely?) and the original was a handful to fly/land- could I fly the replica? No fixed fin- full flying rudder instead.
Perhaps difficult to make ultralight weight. Short nose- difficult to balance with a heavy pilot. (like me.)

Eindecker: (+)Also a high coolness factor. EASY to meet the weight limit. Easy to build- simple design. Pilot sits almost ON the CG, easy to balance. (-)Original had wing warping- I would use ailerons, so not very authentic. LOTS of wires to rig. Also has a full flying horizontal stab, as well as rudder... might be a bit tricky to fly. Should be docile, just not particularly stable. Pretty large- would take quite a bit of room to build compared to some others.

D-VIII: (+) Has all the characteristics of an easy to fly aircraft. Relatively large tail surfaces, high wing (parasol) configuration. (Robert Baslee's replica is said to be one of the nicest around, if you don't mind the extra wing struts) Probably could make ultralight weight. (-)Cantilever wings. Late war aircraft- I like the appearance of the early markings. (Hey, this is MY list, I can list that as a minus!) Not a significant aircraft really in the war. Short nose- difficult to balance with a heavy pilot.

D-VII (+) Long nose, easy to balance. Simple lines, easy to build. Fairly generous tail surfaces, with a fixed fin and horizontal stab- should be fairly easy to fly. (-) Cantilever wings again- I'm worried about my ability to make certain this is strong enough without excessive weight. UGLY. Perhaps too heavy for an ultralight.

So, here is my problem: I am (was, more like) a student pilot with ~42 hours... but my logbook got lost in a move. I think REALLY lost, not just misplaced. (Left in a car that I sold, I think...) So, I have to start over if I want to get licensed. (expensive!) Hence my emphasis on Ultralights. It also helps that Ultralights are very cheap to fly. It almost seems that my decision is made for me (the Eindecker) but I REALLY want to build the Albatross. Perhaps I will do them both, in that order. ???
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No war for environmentalists! Drill here!

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"Not even before they are born! " - ME

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Old 25 September 2001, 03:41 PM   #7
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These were essentially scaled down Fokker D.VIII aircraft. In Paul Leaman's new Fokker book it shows one of these, the V.39 in lozenge with the Dutch orange disc marking on the fuselage. The engine was the 50 or 80 hp Gnome. The overall dimensions were smaller and the wings were fabric covered and not plywood. The V.40 was even smaller and was powered by the 35 hp 3 cylinder Anzani Y shaped radial. Both were popular with the pilots who flew them, but they didn't enter production. That is what it says in Leaman's book. You could have a small aircraft, and have it be totally accurate dimension wise. The powerplant would be the newer item. A Rotax maybe could replace the Anzani if you did the V.40.
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Old 25 September 2001, 04:22 PM   #8
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Man, I wish I had the luck some of you guys have! "Yeah, I've got a Gnome 160, found it out in the barn behind an old Chevy pickup..." If you happen to trip over a 180hp Mercedes in your travels, give me a shout!
 
Old 26 September 2001, 06:06 AM   #9
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Brad
* * I agree with you about Bob's earlier small scale replicas. However, his new full scale Nieuport is very accurate. There are pictures on his web site at Aerodrome Airplanes. It's worth a look.
* * * * * Ralph
 
Old 26 September 2001, 06:24 AM   #10
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Rex,
Keep your eyes open. A friend and I rescued a 80 LeRhone in new condition and a boat anchor Gnome the day before the building they were in was to be bulldozed and buried!!
I have a Wright R 2600 in the crate that was found in a corn crib. It does happen.
 
 

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