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Other WWI Aviation Airfields, equipment, tactics, training, uniforms and all other WWI aviation topics

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Old 19 May 2010, 02:23 PM   #1
hurricane3
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162 Aero Squadron

In my local cemetary there is a grave of a individual who served in the 162 Aero squadron,during the First world war. I can find no information of the squadron any where on the internet.
Can anyone provide a history of this unit ,where based ,dates ect.Thanks
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Old 19 May 2010, 03:52 PM   #2
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The only information I have comes from Les Roger's book entitled,

British Aviation Squadron Markings of World War I

According to this book, No. 162 Squadron was formed June 1, 1918. Disbanded July 4, 1918.

Hope this helps.
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Old 19 May 2010, 04:13 PM   #3
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thanks

Well it helps a little ,but I still don;t know what type of squadron it was,and where it was based. Was it only a stateside squadron? Or did it go overseas?
Was it perhaps a maintence squardon rather than a combat group,or maybe a traing squardron?
I have been looking at this mans grave for years and would love to know what type of American aero Squadron this was that he served in. He was and enlisted man a so he wasn't a pilot, perhaps a machinic? Thanks so much for your reply.maybe the pieces of the puzzle will come together.
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Old 19 May 2010, 07:15 PM   #4
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Only being in existence for a month, it doesn't appear the squadron did much of anything. The only other information in the aforementioned book is a statement that this squadron's personnel were used as reinforcements to squadrons in France. There's no other information from this source.
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Old 19 May 2010, 07:38 PM   #5
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I think there is some confusion because of the way hurricane 3 worded his question. Leatherhead is talking about the British No. 162 squadron, while Hurricane3 seems to be asking about the U.S. 162nd Aero Squadron.

The 162nd Aero Squadron was initially formed in December, 1917 and went to England in February, 1918. Their emblem was a map of the U.S. which is a bit odd. There were a great many kinds of groups in the Air Service and they were all called Aero Squadrons whether they flew aircraft of some kind or were just groups of mechanics or construction personnel or even lumberjacks who were assigned to the U.S. to harvest spruce trees that were used to make aircraft. The 162nd Aero Squadron was comprised of two officers and 148 enlisted men and was a unit of mechanics whose job was to train other mechanics at various locations in England. They were not a front line unit and saw no combat.
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Old 19 May 2010, 10:51 PM   #6
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To add a bit of detail, culled straight from Gorrell's history, 162nd Aero was organized 17 December 1917 at Line 13, Kelly Field, San Antonio, TX. Departed Kelly Field 21 December 1917 and arrived Wilbur Wright Field, Fairfield, OH 24 December 1917. Training at Wilbur Wright was in Schools of Administration, Airplanes, and Motor Transport.

Departed 20 February 1918 for Garden City, NY, were equipped and departed 24 February 1918, arriving Liverpool, England 5 March 1918. American Rest Camp, Romsey, England for 10 days, then to Dover, Kent for service at Swingate Downs, RAF Aerodrome. Training in rotary motors until 18 May 1918, then departed to RAF Joyce Green, Dartford, Kent.

Then it gets busier, as the squadron is split into four parts that go to different places. They eventually got as far as Air Service Supply Depot Nr. 1, Clichy, France, on 3 November 1918.

Commanding Officers in order:
1Lt Edmund B. Frye, Jr.
1Lt Luther W. Kibler

See Gorrell's info including commanding officers and roster of commissioned personnel of the squadron, as well as a note about a citation received by one of the men at 162nd Aero Squadron and the next two pages.

Dan
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Old 20 May 2010, 04:29 AM   #7
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Thanks so much guys

Thankyou so much for taking the time to help clear up a mystery for me,that has lasted over 30 years.Now I know so much more about this indidvual who served in the 162nd. Now if I could find what type of aircraft they flew and what type of mission the had all would be complete.
But at least know I know something about this unknown airman who has been forgotton by every one,as his grave is unattended and I'am sure is forgtten.Thanks you so very much,I will print out the information you helpfully gave me.
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Old 20 May 2010, 04:39 AM   #8
hurricane3
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sorry ,didn't see Jims or Leatherheads posts before I wrote my last post.

I hadn't noticed Jims or Leatherheads posts before my last post.So now I know the mission and that there probley wern't any planes assigned to the unit.The mystery is solved thanks to you guys. Thankyou all who took the time to help remember a forgotton veteran.
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Old 20 May 2010, 07:38 AM   #9
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Correct. Back then every unit in the Air Service was called an Aero Squadron and a fair number of them had little to do with flying airplanes. Also, the numbering of them is not very intuitive and there were many numbers that were never used and never intended to be used. Part of that was misdirection during the war - they hoped that the Germans would hear numbers way up in the hundreds and be tricked into thinking that the U.S. actually had that many Squadrons and lose their morale.
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Old 20 May 2010, 10:15 AM   #10
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It's all interesting, but it certainly can be confusing.

A lot of them published private squadron histories, and every once in a while I find another. Kind of cool.

Dan
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